Young Kim is a Puppet for the NRA

Kim Received an ‘A’ Rating from NRA, Gun Owners of CA

Kim Received An ‘A’ Rating From The National Rifle Association. In October 2016, the National Rifle Association Political Victory Fund gave Kim an “A” rating based on “her pro-gun record in the California Legislature.” [National Rifle Association Political Victory Fund, 10/25/2016]

Gun Owners of CA gave Kim ‘A’ rating in 2016. In November 2016, the Gun Owners of California gave Kim an “A” rating. Their rating for Kim, an incumbent candidate, was based “exclusively” on her voting record while in office. [Gun Owners of California, 11/8/2016]

Kim Has Taken At Least $3,500 from the NRA Since 2014

Kim received $2,500 contribution from the NRA in 2018. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Kim received $2,500 from the National Rifle Association in the 2018 election cycle. [Center for Responsive Politics, Accessed 9/14/2018]

Kim received $1,000 contribution from the NRA in 2014. In December 2015, The Orange County Register reported that Kim received $1,000 from the National Rifle Association since 2010. According to the California Secretary of State, the NRA Political Victory PAC contributed $1,000 to Kim on October 14, 2014. [The Orange County Register, 12/9/2015; California Secretary of State, 10/14/2014]

Kim Voted Against Prohibited Concealed Weapons at Schools

Kim Voted Against Prohibiting Concealing Weapons On School Grounds. In September 2015, Kim voted against:

“Recast[ing] the provisions relating to a person holding a valid license to carry a concealed firearm to allow that person to carry a firearm in an area that is within 1,000 feet of, but not on the grounds of, a public or private school providing instruction in kindergarten or grades 1 to 12, inclusive. The bill would also delete the exemption that allows a person holding a valid license to carry a concealed firearm to bring or possess a firearm on the campus of a university or college. The bill would create an additional exemption from those prohibitions for certain appointed peace officers who are authorized to carry a firearm by their appointing agency, and an exemption for certain retired reserve peace officers who are authorized to carry a concealed or loaded firearm.”

The bill passed the Assembly 54 to 24, with 2 not voting, and became law. [SB 707, passed the Assembly, 9/1/2015; became law, 10/10/2015]

Kim Voted Against Closing ‘Bullet Button’ Loophole after San Bernardino Mass Shooting

Kim Voted Against Redefining “Assault Weapons” To Include Semiautomatic Centerfire Rifles Or Pistols That Do Not Have A Fixed Magazine And Requiring Owners To Register The Guns With The State. In June 2016, Kim voted against redefining “assault weapons” to include semiautomatic centerfire rifles or pistols that do not have a fixed magazine and requiring owners to register the guns with the state. According to the bill:

Revis[ing] this definition of ‘assault weapon’ to mean a semiautomatic centerfire rifle or a semiautomatic pistol that does not have a fixed magazine but has any one of those specified attributes. The bill would also define ‘fixed magazine’ to mean an ammunition feeding device contained in, or permanently attached to, a firearm in such a manner that the device cannot be removed without disassembly of the firearm action… This bill would require that any person who, from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2016, inclusive, lawfully possessed an assault weapon that does not have a fixed magazine, as defined, including those weapons with an ammunition feeding device that can be removed readily from the firearm with the use of a tool, register the firearm with the Department of Justice before January 1, 2018, but not before the effective date of specified regulations.

The bill passed the Assembly 43 to 31, with 6 not voting, but, in the latest action, died on Senate inactive file. [AB 1664, passed the Assembly, 6/1/2016; died on Senate inactive file, 11/30/2016]

AB 1664 aimed to close ‘bullet button’ loophole in response to December 2015 San Bernardino mass shooting.  According to The Valley Sentinel in January 2016, AB 1664 was introduced to close a loophole in law that allows the gun industry to evade the assault weapons ban in California. Specifically, AB 1664 will prohibit the use of a “bullet button” or other tool that allows for easily changeable magazines on all military-style assault weapons.  Guns equipped with a bullet button are functionally the same as illegal assault weapons, but they are sold legally in California. This kind of assault rifle was used in the San Bernardino mass shooting last month and a shooting at Los Angeles International Airport in 2013.

[The Valley Sentinel, 1/14/2016]

Kim Voted Against Senate companion bill to AB 1664. In June 2016, Kim voted against:

Revis[ing] this definition of ‘assault weapon’ to mean a semiautomatic centerfire rifle, or a semiautomatic pistol that does not have a fixed magazine but has any one of those specified attributes. The bill would also define ‘fixed magazine’ to mean an ammunition feeding device contained in, or permanently attached to, a firearm in such a manner that the device cannot be removed without disassembly of the firearm action.

The bill passed the Assembly 44 to 30, with 6 not voting, and became law. [California Legislature, SB 880, passed the Assembly, 6/30/2016; became law, 7/1/2016]

Kim Voted Against Laws to Better Process Gun Records

Kim voted against allowing sheriffs to process concealed carry applications. In April and September 2015, Kim voted against AB 1134, a bill that provided,

That a sheriff is not precluded from entering into an agreement with the chief or other head of a municipal police department of a city for the chief or other head of a municipal police department to process all applications for licenses to carry a concealed handgun, renewals of those licenses, and amendments of those licenses, for that city’s residents.

The Assembly passed the bill in a 49 to 30 vote, with one person not voting, and the bill became law. [California Legislature, AB 1134, Assembly concurred with Senate amendments 9/4/2015; became law 10/11/2015]

Kim voted against requiring background checks for purchasing ammunition. In June 2016, Kim voted against SB 1235, a bill that allowed,

Ammunition to be sold only to a person whose information matches an entry in the Automated Firearms System and who is eligible to possess ammunition, to a person who has a current certificate of eligibility issued by the department, or to a person who purchases or transfers the ammunition in a single ammunition transaction, as specified.

In June 2016, The Sacramento Bee reported,

Last week, aides to [Lt. Gov.] Newsom, who is running for governor in 2018, lashed out at [Senate President Pro Tem] de León for ‘petty personal grudges’ when the Senate amended his ammo legislation, Senate Bill 1235, that would pre-empt a section of Newsom’s ballot measure should both pass. Newsom’s version would vet prospective ammunition buyers in advance through background checks by the Department of Justice, while de León’s wants to use an existing database of people prohibited from owning guns at the point of sale. De León obtained a letter from the Legislative Counsel’s Office stating that SB 1235 would not expand the list of people and groups exempted from the ammo purchasing authorization requirements.

The Assembly passed the bill in a 46 to 30 vote, with four people not voting, and the bill became law. [California Legislature, SB 1235, 6/30/2016; The Sacramento Bee, 6/30/2016]

Kim voted against allocating $5 million to reduce Armed Prohibited Persons System backlog. In June 2016, Kim voted against SB 826, a bill that made,

Appropriations for the support of state government for the 2016-17 fiscal year… For local assistance, Department of Justice, payable from the Firearms Safety and Enforcement Special Fund… $5,000,000. Provisions: 1. The funds appropriated in this item shall be expended to contract with local law enforcement agencies to reduce the backlog of individuals who are in the Armed Prohibited Persons System (APPS) and who illegally possess firearms. The focus on reducing the APPS backlog shall be on persons with mental illness and with domestic violence restraining orders who are prohibited persons in possession of firearms.

The bill passed the Assembly 52 to 27, with one person not voting, and became law. [California Legislature, SB 826, passed the Assembly, 6/15/2016; became law, 6/27/2016]

Kim voted against increasing firearm transaction fees. In June 2016, Kim voted against SB 843, a bill that authorized the Department of Justice to increase the fee a dealer must charge each firearm purchaser for each firearm transaction for the purpose of supporting department program costs at a “rate not to exceed any increase in the California Consumer Price Index and not to exceed the reasonable cost of regulation to the department.” The bill passed the Assembly 51 to 27, with two people not voting, and became law. [California Legislature, SB 843, passed the Assembly, 6/16/2016; became law, 6/27/2016]

Kim Voted Against Effort to Curb Untraceable ‘Ghost Guns’ After Parkland

Kim voted against expanding definition of firearm to ‘curb’ ‘ghost guns.’ In June 2016, Kim voted against AB 1673, a bill that sought to expand the “definition of ‘firearm’ to curb homemade weapons created without serial numbers, or ‘ghost guns.’” The Assembly passed the bill in a 46 to 33 vote, with one person not voting, but the Governor vetoed. In a statement, Governor Brown said of the bill, “While I appreciate the author’s intent, the actual wording of this bill is unduly vague and could have far reaching and unintended consequences.” [California Legislature, AB 1673, 6/30/2016; vetoed by Governor, 7/1/2016; The Sacramento Bee, 7/1/2016]

ATF can’t regulate ‘ghost guns,’ sale of which is ‘booming’ after Parkland. In February 2018, CBS News reported that they purchased a “ghost gun,” a gun that has no serial number, is “completely untraceable,” and legal, online with “no background check or waiting period”:

It’s not technically a firearm, because the part that would be registered — the lower receiver — still needs work. But a do-it-yourself kit came with all the necessary parts, even the drill bits and a plastic template showing exactly where to drill the holes… Following an instructional YouTube video, it took less than three hours to build… Countless websites offer so-called ghost gun kits for everything from handguns to AR-15s and AK-47s… Police say unregistered, homemade guns were used last November when Kevin Neal killed five people in a Northern California shooting spree, and in 2013, when John Zawahri shot and killed five in Santa Monica.

According to Dave Hamilton, senior special agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, websites that sell ghost guns are “trying to appeal to a certain segment of the population… Felons who can’t go to a gun store and legally purchase a firearm, or people who just don’t want the government knowing what type of firearms they have.” According to Ginger Colbrun, a member of the ATF’s Southern California Public Information Office, “There’s nothing the ATF can do. These firearms are with gang members, these firearms are being are being found at various crime scenes all over the country.” Colbrun added, “ATF can’t go shut down the people who are selling these parts because these parts are not regulated.” In March 2018, Slate reported that the sale of ghost guns after the Parkland shooting in Florida was “booming.” [CBS News, 2/13/2018; Slate, 3/5/2018]

…And Kim Voted Against Other Common Sense Gun Law Reforms

Kim Voted Against Prohibiting The Possession Of Large-Capacity Magazines. In June 2016, Kim voted against: “Mak[ing] it [the sale, gift, and loan of a large-capacity magazine] an infraction punishable by a fine not to exceed $100 for the first offense, by a fine not to exceed $250 for the 2nd offense, and by a fine not to exceed $500 for the 3rd or subsequent offense, for a person to possess any large-capacity magazine, regardless of the date the magazine was acquired.” The bill passed the Assembly 44 to 31, with 5 not voting, and became law. [California Legislature, SB 1446, passed the Assembly, 6/30/2016; became law, 7/1/2016]

Kim voted against outlawing purchasing of more than one firearm of any type within 30-day period. In June 2016, Kim voted against AB 1674:

Existing law, subject to exceptions, prohibits a person from making more than one application to purchase a handgun within any 30-day period. Violation of that prohibition is a crime… Existing law prohibits a firearms dealer from delivering a handgun to a person whenever the dealer is notified by the Department of Justice that within the preceding 30-day period the purchaser has made another application to purchase a handgun that does not fall within an exception to the 30-day prohibition. A violation of that delivery prohibition by the dealer is a crime. This bill would make the 30-day prohibition and the dealer delivery prohibition described above applicable to all types of firearms.

The bill passed the Assembly 44 to 34, with 2 not voting, but was vetoed by the Governor. [California Legislature, AB 1674, passed the Assembly, 6/30/2016; vetoed by Governor, 7/1/2016]

Kim voted against expanding gun violence restraining order scope. In June 2016, Kim voted against AB 2607, a bill that authorized,

An employer, a coworker, a mental health worker who has seen the person as a patient in the last 6 months, or an employee of a secondary or postsecondary school that the person has attended in the last 6 months to file a petition for an ex parte, one-year, or renewed gun violence restraining order. This bill would also specify that these provisions shall not be construed to require any of those persons to seek a gun violence restraining order.

The bill passed the Assembly 41 to 37, with two people not voting, but was vetoed by the Governor. [California Legislature, AB 2607, passed the Assembly, 6/1/2016; vetoed by Governor, 8/1/2016]

Kim voted against making misdemeanors the petty theft of a gun, carry ammunition on to school grounds, and receiving a stolen gun. In September 2015, Kim voted against SB 347, a bill that added,

To the list of misdemeanors, the conviction for which is subject to the above prohibition on possessing a firearm within 10 years of the conviction, the petty theft of a firearm, and convictions on or after January 1, 2016, for the misdemeanor offenses of carrying ammunition onto school grounds and receiving stolen property consisting of a firearm. The bill would make other technical, nonsubstantive changes. Because a violation of these provisions would be a crime, and because this bill would expand the application of the crime to a larger class of potential offenders, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

The bill passed the Assembly 46 to 30, with four people not voting, but was vetoed by the Governor. [California Legislature, SB 347, passed the Assembly 9/8/2015; vetoed by Governor 10/3/2015]

Kim voted to make false reports on stolen guns a misdemeanor. In June 2016, Kim voted for AB 1695, a bill that made,

Prohibition applicable to a person who reports to certain individuals and peace officers that a firearm has been lost or stolen, knowing the report to be false. By changing the definition of an existing crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would also make it a misdemeanor for a person convicted of violating this provision to own a firearm within 10 years of the conviction.

The Assembly passed the bill in a 52 to 25 vote, with three people not voting, and became law. [California Legislature, AB 1695, Assembly concurred with Senate amendments, 6/30/2016; became law 7/1/2016]

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